Book Review: Shallow Graves by Maureen Boyle

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Shallow Graves: The Hunt for the New Bedford Highway Serial Killer by Maureen Boyle

In 1988, the bodies of women began to turn up along the highways outside of New Bedford, Massachusetts. The town had begun as a whaling hub, then changed its industry over to textiles when whaling began to wane. Frederick Douglass had once been a resident of the town, and Moby Dick was based on whaling ships heading out of town. By the 1980s, however, New Bedford was struggling with that near universal blight: drugs and crime. Many of the victims (eleven in all) were troubled women, drug addicts, prostitutes, or both. The pool of potential suspects was vast, from fishermen to white collar workers to itinerant truckers. Nearly all the victims were found months after their bodies had been dumped, and modern forensic science as we now know it was in its infancy.

This is a mystery that remains an ongoing puzzle to this day. Boyle, one of the reporters who first broke the story in 1988, presents the facts to us in an organized, thorough manner. You can tell that this mystery has remained on her mind and in her heart for thirty years. Boyle generally leaves herself out of the narrative, focusing on the investigators, the victims and their families, the suspects, and the local politics. This is a true crime story written against the backdrop of a town in decline, but trying desperately to reinvent itself amidst its troubles. This should resonate strongly with many of us in this day and age, as the specter of heroin abuse and urban/suburban decay continue to blight many communities in this country.

Fans of true crime will enjoy this strong entry to the genre. Even if you don’t usually gravitate towards crime novels, Boyle’s portrayal of New Bedford in the 1980s is worth reading in and of itself.

A copy of this book was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

 

Book Review: Paperbacks from Hell by Grady Hendrix

Paperbacks from Hell: A History of Horror Fiction from the ’70s and ’80s by Grady Hendrix

I remember walking into a used bookstore or into my local library book sale as a teenager and heading straight for the most lurid, monstrous, kitschy horror titles I could find. I cut my teeth on 666 and The Amityville Horror by Jay Anson. I read and reread Swan Song and Stinger by Robert McCammon. Cult horror was an important part of my childhood (started off by writers like R.L. Stine, Lois Duncan, and Christopher Pike). How could I resist revisiting something so fun?

Grady Hendrix clearly loves the topic. He revisits cult favorites and forgotten (some rightfully so) tales. In chapters broken down by existential threat (evil children, murderous animals, demons, haunted houses, D&D, etc), he brings the best and the worst of cult horror novels into the light of day. I especially enjoy the attention he gives to the cover artists of these books. Often the unknown and unsung heroes of the genre, these frequently anonymous artists created some absolutely stunning artwork to accompany some truly weird books.

Unfortunately, my TBR may never be the same. There were so many books included in this that I had never heard of but now absolutely have to read. Fortunately, a suggested reading list graces the back of the book, allowing you to ease into the world of cult horror. And ease I probably should. It’s been a while since I went to the forgotten paperbacks section of my local used bookstore. I’m rather looking forward to rifling through the titles, hoping to find a gem with a macabre and melodramatic cover, just waiting to be rediscovered.