Book Review: Dead Men Whistling by Graham Masterson

Dead Men Whistling by Graham Masterson

This is the ninth book in the Katie Maguire series, so this review will probably contain some minor spoilers for the previous books in the series. However, I read this book without having read the others, and was able to enjoy it on its own merits.


Garda detective Katie Maguire is still reeling from her last brutal case; her dog, Barney, was nearly beaten to death, and the man responsible for his condition has managed to avoid prosecution for his crimes.

When a Garda officer is found in a local park beheaded with a tin whistle sticking out of his neck, Katie Maguire finds herself thrown into a case that could bring down the entire Garda from within.

This is a dark, grim murder mystery, along the lines of Jeffery Deaver. Masterson was a horror writer prior to trying his hand at mysteries, and it shows. Beyond the gore, this is a book that doesn’t look away from the horror and terror of its plot. Many would try to come at the darkness of the plot from the side, or from any safer angle. Masterson sets off headlong into the jaws of the beast, and takes the reader along with him.

My biggest problem with the book is that it’s noisy. There are numerous subplots banging around in the background, and sometimes it is hard to find the thread of the main plot through all the chatter. Perhaps this is the inevitable result of a long running series, and those who have read the previous books may find more in hose subplots than I did.

A copy of this book was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Book Review: Macbeth by Jo Nesbø

Macbeth by Jo Nesbø

This is part of the Hogarth Shakespeare undertaking, in which modern author reimagine the Bard’s most famous works. In this offering, Jo Nesbø (of The Snowman fame) brings Macbeth into a Northern city amidst overwhelming police corruption. Duncan has recently been promoted to Chief Inspector, following the downfall of the former, highly corrupt chief. He quickly promotes his SWAT commander, Macbeth, to oversee a new department aimed at stopping the flow of drugs and violence into the city, most especially “Brew”, peddled by drug kingpin, Hecate. What follows is the age-old tale of murderous ambition, and the consequences of putting ends before means-wrapped in a dark, police thriller package.

Nesbø does a great job of sinking his story into the mud and the grit and keeping it there. The story is undeniably a dark one, and Nesbø pulls no punches. The entirety of the story takes place in dreary grayness or in the darkness of the night. Nesbø has given us a setting that is downright claustrophobic.

I’ve read several of the Hogarth stories so far, and I think this may be one of my favorites, I always enjoyed the Macboeth story, and Nesbø’s interpretation makes the story feel new, even as we trod old ground.

An advance copy of this book was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Book Review: Anatomy of a Scandal by Sarah Vaughn


Anatomy of a Scandal by Sarah Vaughn

James Whitehouse is a successful politician and close friends with the Prime Minister. Sophie is his faithful wife. Then a scandal breaks, James is accused first of having an affair with a member of his staff, then of rape. Sophie desperately needs to believe in her husband’s innocence. Kate Woodcroft, the prosecuting attorney, sincerely believes in his guilt. As the case moves on, secrets from the past threaten to come to light.

This is a slow-building thriller that explores the nature of love and truth, privilege and power. Vaughn does a splendid job of alternating between the past and present, and between husband, wife, and prosecutor. We explore each person’s life, and see what a fragile thing truth really is.

The book builds slowly, which can be frustrating for those who want the plot to go-go-go. And any one experiencing psychological thriller fatigue (like me), can find the slower pace a bit trying. But in all, Vaughn’s exploration of how privilege impacts truth is a vital and important topic in this day and age. I would recommend you give it a go.

An advance copy of this book was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Book Review: Law and Vengeance by Mike Papantonio

Law and vengeance

Law and Vengeance by Mike Panantonio

An explosive case against a weapons manufacturer sets the law firm of Bergman & Deketomis, and young lawyer Gina Romano, in the sights of some truly awful people. Gina’s mentor and friend, Angus Moore, is killed under suspicious circumstances while investigating a whistle-blower’s claims that weapons manufacturer Arbalest’s holographic gun sight, the “Sight-Clops,” is responsible for a number of preventable deaths. Gina vows vengeance for her murdered friend, and finds herself facing down ruthless businessmen, crooked cops, assassins, and gun lobbyists.

I decided the plot of the book sounded interesting, and certainly seemed relevant in these times. I also looked forward to a legal thriller whose political views seemed more in line with my own (no Ring of Fire– or Target Omega-style dick waving here). But I just  . . . couldn’t get into it. I don’t know, I’ve enjoyed legal thrillers in the past, but this one just wasn’t for me. The pace of the book is quick, and I always love having a woman as the protagonist, but the dialogue seemed a bit stilted and unnatural. The character interactions didn’t flow like conversations, but instead each line bounced off the others with little subtext and a lot of exposition. After a while, the choppy flow of the dialogue started to interfere with my reading of the interesting story, and I simply had to stop.

Still, fans of legal thrillers may want to give this one a try, as I’m always willing to admit when something just wasn’t for me, but may well appeal to someone else.

An advance copy of this book was provided by the publisher in exchange for a honest review.

Book Review: Lola by Maria Scrivner Love

Lola by Maria Scrivner Love

Lola is adept at pretending to be less than she is. To the world she is the dutiful girlfriend to her gang-leader boyfriend, Garcia. She cooks, she cleans, and she keeps house. What no one outside the Crenshaw Six realizes is that Lola is actually the power behind the throne. In reality she is the sharply intelligent and utterly ruthless leader of their gang. When a representative of the Mexican Cartel makes the small-time gang an offer they can’t refuse, Lola finds herself drawn increasingly deeper into the world of the international drug trade. As the stakes get higher, Lola has to use every tool in her arsenal to ensure that not only does she survive, but that her gang makes it out on top.

This is a stong debut showing by former CSI: Miami writer Maria Scrivner Love. The character of Lola is well-realized as a strong, intelligent woman who must always play the part of the quiet, subservient girlfriend in order to succeed in the man’s world of the drug trade. Her internal struggle between feeling the need to adhere to social norms and her desire to be recognized for her own accomplishments mirrors the struggle of all ambitious women, no matter the legitimacy of their work.

Also on full display in this book are the racial tensions within the city of Los Angeles. Each group, latino, black, and white, have set aside their own exclusive areas within the city, and stepping outside one’s assigned area invites suspicion at best and violence at worst.

In all, this is an original and intriguing thriller. The action is fast-paced, the characters well realized and multidimensional. Fans of crime fiction will enjoy this book, as will anyone looking for an atypical book featuring a strong female protagonist.

An advance copy of this book was provided by the publisher via LibraryThing in exchange for an honest review.

Book Review: Say Nothing by Brad Parks

Say Nothing by Brad Parks
This book hits the ground running. Judge Scott Sampson gets a text from his wife’s phone telling him that she is going to be picking up their six-year-old twins from school. It is not until his wife gets home, sans children that he realizes something is very wrong. Within minutes, the phone rings and a voice on the other end tells him to say nothing, that they have his kids, and instructions will follow. Sampson is a federal judge, and the kidnappers seem intent on subverting the court for their own ends. While trying to investigate the kidnapping without alerting the authorities, personal and professional secrets and animosities are dredged to the surface. Slowly, everyone in Sampson’s life begins to look like a suspect.

This is a tidy little thriller. Parks manages to instill a real sense of paranoia throughout the story, and he throws enough plot twists and red herrings into the mix to keep the reader guessing. This is also one of those books where literally nothing seems to go right for our protagonist, and you find yourself wishing that the poor guy would just get one little thing to go his way.

Suspense and thriller lovers will likely enjoy this book. The plot revolving around the manipulation and coercion of a federal judge also resonates in this day and age. The entirety of the plot, once revealed, feels frighteningly plausible.

An advance copy of this book was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Say Nothing will be available for purchase on March 7th, 2017.

Book Review: Right Behind You by Lisa Gardner

Right Behind You by Lisa Gardner

This is the 7th book featuring Gardner’s profiler pair, Quincy and Rainie. In case it isn’t obvious, there will likely be spoilers ahead if you haven’t read the other books. Additional caveat: I have not read the previous books in the series, but I was not lost, you can definitely read this book as a standalone if you wish.

The book begins from the point of view of a young boy. Telly loves his little sister, Sharlah, and will do anything to protect her from his drug addicted, abusive parents. One night, Telly’s father goes into a drug-fueled rampage, and Telly is forced to kill him to save himself and his sister.

Fast forward eight years and Sharlah is the foster daughter of Quincy and Rainie, ex-profilers and now private sector consultants. She hasn’t seen or had any contact with her brother since the night of their parent’s deaths. Then a simple “shots fired” call turns into a murder spree, and it seems like Sharlah’s older brother may be the gunman. As Quincy and Rainie are called into the case, Sharlah is forced to face the possibility that her brother may have always been a monster.

I enjoyed this dark thriller. Even without having read the previous books, it was easy to slip into the world of the primary characters. The subject matter is dark but well written, and while the plot seems to be straightforward at first, ample twists and turns will keep you interested. What I most liked was the intelligence of the Quincy and Rainie duo. You know all those niggling little details that occur in every mystery? The ones where you stop and go “Wait, that isn’t quite right,” well, those little things occur here as well, but (rather uniquely in my opinion) those little inconsistencies are picked up on by the protagonists. rather than being used as gotcha fuel later on in the book, those random little details are actually used to further the plot. More authors should make that attempt.

Fans of Jeffery Deaver or Lisa Unger will probably like this book, and I would think that if you’ve been following series thus far, this should be a no-brainer.

An advance copy of this book was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Right Behind You will be available for purchase on January 31st, 2017.

Book Review: A Time of Torment by John Connolly

a time of torment john connolly

 

A Time of Torment by john Connolly

 

This is the fourteenth installment in Connolly’s Charlie Parker series. It’s always difficult to come into a series this late, but I found A Time of Torment to be an engaging thriller.

Though the book weaves between several subplots (many of which are tied to events in previous books, or foreshadowing future books), the main focus of A Time of Torment is the unfortunate Jerome Burnel. Burnel is a fallen hero, lauded for preventing a massacre in the past, then brought low. Recently released from prison, Burnel seeks out private investigator Charlie Parker. Burnel tells Parker his story: the desperate few minutes fighting the horror that made him a hero, then the mysterious circumstances that presaged his imprisonment and torment. Burnel suspects his imprisonment may be related to his heroic actions, but there is only one lead to follow; a name whispered in the dark: The Dead King.

When Burnel goes missing, Charlie Parker must uncover the mysterious cabal that ruined Burnel’s life, and seek out and stop The Dead King before more blood is spilled.

A Time of Torment superbly blends the supernatural with a crime thriller. Connolly’s prose is elegant and visceral at the same time. While certain aspects of the plot are certainly better if one has read the previous books, A Time of Torment can stand alone with only a little difficulty. The pace of the book is fast, even in the detours from the main plot. The biggest complaint I can utter is that Charlie Parker seems to be a bit of a supporting character in this book, but that is mainly because the supporting characters are given a good bit of headway in which to grow. Charlie Parker doesn’t grow much as a character in A Time of Torment, but with fourteen books under his belt, and having recently been dead, the reader can forgive him for taking a break.

In all, this is a fast paced and enjoyable thriller. Fans of Dean Koontz, or Jonathan Maberry will enjoy this series.

 

An advance ebook was provided by the publisher, Atria Books, via Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.