Book Review: Jane Seymour The Haunted Queen by Alison Weir

Jane Seymour the Haunted Queen by Alison Weir

This is the third book in Alison Weir’s historical fiction series about the six wives of Henry VIII. I’d say there’s spoilers in this review, but can such a well known historical drama really be spoiled at this point?

This story centers around Jane Seymour, Henry VIII’s third wife and [SPOILER ALERT]

His only wife to bear him a son.

[END SPOILER ALERT]

Jane was born to lesser nobility, began her career at court as a lady’s maid to Queen Katherine (Henry’s first wife) and later Anne Boleyn after the doomed lady ascended to the throne. It was in this capacity that she caught the eye of an increasingly frustrated Henry VIII.

Alison Weir is rightly lauded for her work in both fiction and nonfictional historical works. While this particular book is a fictionalization of Jane Seymour’s life, Weir hews closely to known historical fact for much of the book. Where she deviates or invents, a very helpful and informative afterward explains her choices of plot and interpretation.

Fans of historical fiction will greatly enjoy this book, which will also appeal to romance readers. The tragedies of Henry VIII’s wives are a fascinating subject, and Weir treats them as such.

A copy of this book was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Book Review: The House on Foster Hill by Jaime Jo Wright

The House on Foster Hill by Jaime Jo Wright

Kaine Prescott has traveled to the ends of the earth (also known as rural Wisconsin) to try to put the suspicious death of her husband behind her. Unable to convince anyone–including the police–that his death was anything other than a tragic accident, Kaine throws her energy into rehabbing the ancient and rundown Foster Hill house, long abandoned and rumored to be haunted. Meanwhile, in 1906, a young woman named Ivy finds the body of a young woman hidden in the hollow tree at Foster Hill. Obsessed with uncovering the girl’s identity, Ivy finds herself in greater and greater danger the more she learns.

This book sounded like such fun. I don’t mind a dual narrative when done well, and I settled myself in for an entertaining haunted house read. Unfortunately, the book fiys more closely into the Christian romance category than anything resembling horror or suspense. I enjoyed the historical half of the narrative for the most part, but I found modern-day Kaine hard to like or care about (aside from her dog).

In the end, this book just wasn’t for me. I’m not a fan of romance most of the time, and I just … don’t really enjoy majorly religious protagonists. I wish the book had billed itself less along haunted house lines and had a blurb that more closely described the plot.

A copy of this book was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Book Review: The Unkillable Kitty O’Kane by Colin Falconer

The Unkillable Kitty O’Kane by Colin Falconer

At the turn of the twentieth century, Kitty O’Kane grows up poor in the slums of Dublin, Ireland, enduring beatings from her drunken father and dreaming of a better life. She gets herself out of her old life and into service with the prestigious White Star line. She is able to secure a position as a stewardess on the line’s newest and largest ship: the Titanic. And so starts the saga of the Unkillable Kitty O’Kane. After becoming romantically involved with a firebrand journalist, Kitty dives into the fight for the poor, the disenfranchised, and for women’s sufferage. She bears witness to the some of the most calamitous and tumultuos events of the early twentieth century. Through Kitty’s eyes we experience the sinking of the Lusitania, the Russian Revolution, and the start of The Troubles in Ireland.

Kitty spends much of the book lamending her past. She ties herself early on to the increasingly erratic reporter, and pines for Tom Doyle, a young boy from her childhood in Dublin who has since grown into a handsome young doctor in London. And this is the crux of the problem for the book. Romance and love triangles are all well and good, but Kitty’s relationship with the men in her life completely takes over any true agency she might have had.

Yes, she witnesses the October Revolution in Russia, but she is only there because the journalist, Lincoln, has dragged her there. She wants to be a journalist herself, but lacks the courage to write in her own words, and rather follows Lincoln’s lead in all her writing. She eschews becoming a wife and mother in favor of adventure and activist (a decision I applaud) yet will not picture a life with her “true love” Tom Doyle that does not adhere to traditional relationships. She may be The Unkillable Kitty O’Kane, survivor of two shipwrecks, Russian snipers, and British armaments, but she is only that by accident, or by someone else’s agency. She is on a quest to better the lives of women in the world, but the author doesn’t let her make an attempt except by the side of a man.

So, the historical aspects of this book were lovely, and Kitty’s insertion into actual historical events, and her meeting with real historical people is well done. But I found Kitty’s lack of agency, and her dependence on an increasingly erratic Lincoln to be frustrating, and runs counter to the plot of a book that emphasized the personal strength and growth of a woman born with nothing who makes something of herself.

A copy of this book was provided by the publisher via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review.

Book Review: The Way to London by Alix Rickoff

the way to london

The Way to London: A Novel of World War II by Alix Rickoff

Lucy Stanhope is a spoiled debutante living the good life in Singapore in the early years of WWII. Her mother is a selfish narcissist, and her step-father is a lecherous creep, and Lucy has no problems defying them or society to live the way she wants. However, when the weight of scandal becomes too much, Lucy finds herself packed up and shipped off to Nanreath Hall in England. Going from the tropical luxury of Singapore to the dreariness of war-time Britain is a kick in the teeth for Lucy. When she befriends a young war orphan, the two make plans to escape the drudgery of the country for London. The perilous journey across a war zone will force Lucy to face her priorities in life, and to confront her mistakes.

This is a beautiful, vividly written book. Rickoff has put an enormous amount of effort into packing every page with an incredible amount of historical detail. You can almost smell the tropical flowers on the breezes of Singapore, and feel the clammy touch of the fog in England. The story is slowly paced, allowing plenty of time to take in the story and get to know the characters.

That being said, this book wasn’t really up my alley. I’m not really one for romances (though if I were going to pick a romance genre it would likely be historical romance). It also kind of irked me that as rich in detail as most of the book was, the author is still relying on the “spoiled brat of a woman is made pure and whole by the love of a noble man” trope, which is nearly as bad as “the pure and virtuous woman finds the strength to tame the wild, uncouth man” trope. For all the detail and time spent on the setting and getting to know our main characters, the interaction between Lucy and her foil/savior, Michael, is uncomplicated and a bit flat. You know through all the sniping that they’re going to wind up together in the end, though I have to admit there were other contenders I was rooting for, and one (from her time in Singapore) whose story would (in my opinion) have been a bit more interesting.

So in all, this is a well written book in a genre I don’t have a lot of patience for. If you’re generally a fan of romance novels, or are into the WWII setting, this might be a good title for you to try.

An advance copy of this book was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Book Review: Mr. Rochester by Sarah Shoemaker


Mr. Rochester by Sarah Shoemaker

You might know this by now, but I’m a huge Jane Eyre fan. I will devour everything and anything related to the book. So when I saw that a book from Mr. Rochester’s point of view was coming out, I jumped on the opportunity like one of my dogs on an errant piece of cheese.

Mr. Rochester did not disappoint. The story begins with young Edward Fairfax Rochester as an unloved second son, torn from Thornfield Hall by an indifferent father to begin his education. The book follows Mr. Rochester though his teen years (banished from his father and older brother to a mill to learn to run a business), through his days in Jamaica (where he meets the mysterious and beautiful Bertha Mason), to his dissipation on the continent (where we meet the opera singer, Celine), and finally, to his fateful journey back to Thornfield where he meets a kind young governess after his horse slips on the ice.

Shoemaker has done a great job of adhering to the tone of the original book; the prose mimics Bronte’s style incredibly well. Shoemaker also manages to bring a fresh feeling to the classic book, while at the same time staying true to the original, no mean feat. In this regard, the book reminds me of Phantom by Susan Kay, another novel which expanded on a well-known story, but remained undiminished even next to the original.

While you do not technically have to read Jane Eyre before reading Mr. Rochester, I would certainly recommend that you read Jane Eyre first. Fans of Jane Eyre should definitely read this book, as should anyone with a love of classic and/or British literature.

An advance copy of this book was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Book Review: The Merchant’s Pearl by Amie O’Brien

 

The Merchant's Pearl.jpgThe Merchant’s Pearl by Amie O’Brien

Leila (formerly Sarai) is a missionary’s daughter sold into slavery after the death of her parents. Living in the cosseted and catty world of the Turkish Sultan’s harem, her main goal has been to remain unnoticed by the Sultan and his princes until she can make a claim for her freedom. When Prince Emre, the Sultan’s second son, claims her as his newest concubine, all her hopes seem to have been dashed. But Emre has been in love with Leila for years, ever since a disastrous attempt by his father to “gift” her to him. Despite Leila’s fear of physical intimacy, and her hesitation to tie herself into the place of a concubine, a rapport grows between the two. Meanwhile, the increasing instability of the Turkish empire in the face of the Industrial Revolution may provide them with a way out of their respective gilded cages.

O’Brien does a great job setting her story inside a well-researched and lovingly crafted historical setting. Her central characters, Leila and Emre, are crafted with multiple dimensions and feel more real than the typical heaving bosom and tall dark and handsome from romance novels. The story is, overall, more complex than many in the genre.

Ultimately, though, this book just didn’t capture me. The more modern speech was a bit jarring at times, but I can concede the use in these days and times. I’m tempted to think that the problem was on my end, I feel that romance novels for me can be hit or miss. However, I would still recommend this book to fans of historical romance. O’Brien clearly has talent as a writer, and aficionados of the genre will find a lot to like in the book.

A copy of this book was provided by the author in exchange for an honest review.

 

 

Book Review: To Capture What We Cannot Keep by Beatrice Colin

To Capture What We Cannot Keep by Beatrice Colin
 

This is nice little historical romance set in the waning days of 19th century France, as bohemians and the bourgeoisie struggle to find a path into the modernizing world. The story blends historical events and people with a fictional plot. We follow Caitriona Wallace, a young Scottish widow tasked with chaperoning two wealthy siblings during their grand European tour. While taking a hot air balloon ride to see Paris from above, Caitriona encounters engineer Emile Nouguier (a real person), who is partnered with Gustav Eiffel to help build the now-famous tower for the Paris World’s Fair of 1889.

What happens next follows fairly standard romantic faire: Caitriona, well-bred widow brought low by the death of her husband, and Emile,treading the line between bourgeois and bohemian, develop a fondness for one another, but must decide whether flouting propriety and convention, and the repercussions sure to follow, is worth a love affair.

I enjoyed this book, more for the rich historical detail than the plot (but then again, I am much more interested in history than in romance). Paris during the late 1800s was a fascinating time, and I loved that this story was set against the construction of the Eiffel Tower, which was hugely controversial in its day. For the most part, the characters are well drawn and interesting, though Caitriona’s two wards, Jamie and Alice Arrol, are self absorbed and clueless enough to thoroughly annoy.

In all, most readers of historical fiction and/or historical romance will like this book. The heroine is smart and relatable, and the romance sweet rather than sordid (while avoiding becoming saccharine).

An advance copy of this book was provided by the publishers via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. To Capture What We Cannot Keep will be available for purchase on November 29th, 2016.