Book Review: Dead Men Whistling by Graham Masterson

Dead Men Whistling by Graham Masterson

This is the ninth book in the Katie Maguire series, so this review will probably contain some minor spoilers for the previous books in the series. However, I read this book without having read the others, and was able to enjoy it on its own merits.


Garda detective Katie Maguire is still reeling from her last brutal case; her dog, Barney, was nearly beaten to death, and the man responsible for his condition has managed to avoid prosecution for his crimes.

When a Garda officer is found in a local park beheaded with a tin whistle sticking out of his neck, Katie Maguire finds herself thrown into a case that could bring down the entire Garda from within.

This is a dark, grim murder mystery, along the lines of Jeffery Deaver. Masterson was a horror writer prior to trying his hand at mysteries, and it shows. Beyond the gore, this is a book that doesn’t look away from the horror and terror of its plot. Many would try to come at the darkness of the plot from the side, or from any safer angle. Masterson sets off headlong into the jaws of the beast, and takes the reader along with him.

My biggest problem with the book is that it’s noisy. There are numerous subplots banging around in the background, and sometimes it is hard to find the thread of the main plot through all the chatter. Perhaps this is the inevitable result of a long running series, and those who have read the previous books may find more in hose subplots than I did.

A copy of this book was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Book Review: The Darkling Bride by Laura Andersen

The Darkling Bride by Laura Andersen

Nestled within the wild mountains of Wicklow, Ireland lies Deeprath Castle, ancestral home to the Gallagher family for centuries. The brooding, ancient keep holds many secrets, and has seen many deaths. When Carragh Ryan is hired by the family’s stern matriarch, Lady Nessa, to catalogue the castle library before the current Viscount donates the property to the National Trust, she finds herself drawn into mysteries both modern an ancient. Ghostly legends and shadowy menace stalk the halls of Deeprath Castle, and death isn’t far behind.

This was an entertaining modern gothic mystery, complete with everything your heart could desire. Andersen gives us an ancient, brooding pile of a castle, complete with a young, handsome (and brooding, obviously) viscount. We have a ghostly “Darkling Bride” said to haunt the castle and grounds, and mysterious deaths from the 1890s and 1990s. Objectively satisfying is the fact that our heroine, Carragh, is no wilting violet, but a smart, bold woman, and certainly up for the challenge of unravelling the Deeprath mystery.

The narrative is split into three parts, following Carragh in the modern day, Lily Gallagher (murdered mother of the current viscount) in the 1990s, and Evan Chase, a writer who marries the troubled Jenny Gallagher in the 1890s. The split narrative can be fraught with peril, but Andersen does well with it, slowly revealing bits and pieces of the central mystery.

If you’re looking for a gothic mystery with modern-day trappings, this is an excellent choice. Fans of historical mysteries, ghost stories, and anything Irish will find a lot to like in this book.

An advance copy of this book was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.