Book Review: Brigtly Burning by Alexa Donne

Brightly Burning by Alexa Donne

Here you have it, folks: Jane Eyre … IN SPACE!

How could I resist? I’ve just come from reading a shockingly good retelling of Jane EyreWITH ZOMBIES! And I’m certainly not the type of person who thinks the classics are sacrosanct, so in the immortal words: why the hell not?

This telling takes us to a dystopian future where the remainder of mankind lives in orbit around the earth after a supervolcano eruption has rendered the planet uninhabitable. However, that was centuries ago, and no one expected their orbital exile to last so long. The orbiting ships are breaking down, resources are scarce, and no one knows what awaits them on Earth…

Jane here takes the form of Stella Ainsley, and intelligent, kind, yet tough orphan who has been living on the poor farming ship Stalwart since she was banished there as a child by her Aunt Reed. Determined to escape the daily struggle of life aboard the Stalwart, Stella takes a governess job aboard the private ship Rochester. But the ship has a reputation; some say it is haunted. The Rochester’s broody, mysterious captain certainly doesn’t help matters, either.

This is a retelling that manages to separate itself from the original. I really loved the transfer of scene to ships orbiting the Earth; the sci-fi aspect was quite interesting and very well done. I also admire the writer’scourage in diverging in a few big ways from the original plot of the book, which is not an easy thing to do in such a beloved classic as Jane Eyre. In all, I think the author’s additions to the story really made it her own, and allowed her own voice to really show through. It’s always nice to be surprised by a story you think you know.

This book is aimed squarely at the YA crowd. If that isn’t one of your preferred genres, best give this a miss. But if you tend to love YA, and especially when there’s sci-fi in the mix, then this book is right up your alley!

An advance copy of this book was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Book Review: Astrophysics for People in a Hurry by Neil deGrasse Tyson

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Astrophysics for People in a Hurry by Neil deGrasse Tyson

I adore Neil deGrasse Tyson. How can you not? The man has helped make science cool, and is a leading voice in promoting technological and scientific advancement and understanding.

Astrophysics for People in a Hurry is a collection of articles dealing with different aspects of the science of outer space. In each chapter, deGrasse Tyson’s wit is clearly on display, making this more of an intellectual chat between friends than a science lecture. deGrasse Tyson has the enviable talent for being able to explain complex phenomena in a way that is interesting, understandable, and yet not condescending. This gift, plus a clear love for his chosen field, has helped make him one of the most visible intellectuals of the modern age.

I listened to the audiobook, which is narrated by deGrasse Tyson himself, and the read was quick, educational, and at times laugh-out-loud funny. If you’re looking for a fun way to brush up on your astrophysics as possible manned Mars missions and space tourism continue to make headlines, you should read this book (or check out the revamped Cosmos, also featuring Neil deGrasse Tyson doing what he does best).

Book Review: Will Save the Galaxy for Food by Yahtzee Croshaw

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Will Save the Galaxy for Food by Yahtzee Croshaw

Like a lot of people, I discovered Yahtzee Croshaw via his incredibly funny animated video game review, Zero Punctuation. Croshaw has a biting wit, incisive comments, and ridiculous visuals to accompany his reviews, which are delivered snarkily with barely pause for breath. When I later learned that he had written actual books, I quickly picked up Jam (a silly and fun take on the apocalypse) and Mogworld (a frankly brilliant look at everything that’s wrong with MMOs). Will Save the Galaxy for Food is Croshaw’s latest, and keeps up with his snarky cultural commentary.

The story finds our protagonist living a down-and-out existence on the moon. Ever since Quantum Tunneling made interstellar travel safe and instantaneous, demand for space pilots, even ones that have saved entire planets, has simply vanished. Living day to day scrounging for space tourists is demeaning, but what else can you do? When a fat paycheck falls into his lap, he figures that nearly anything is worth the money. Unfortunately, the job involves flying around the spoiled son of an Earth mobster, while having to pretend to be Jacques McKeown, a greasy bastard who turned the true stories of space pilots into pulp novels of derring-do, and who is universally despised by pilots across the black. Naturally every goes wrong, and our hero is thrown against space pirates, casual violence, upstart societies, political intrigue, man-eating aliens, and deadly hitmen.

The book was fantastically funny and delightful fun. Zaniness abounds as the pilot and his cohorts scramble from one adventure to another. The background given for the story is rich with references to problems we face in our own time. In fact, you need look no further than the brutish and devious Mr. Henderson, the Terran mobster (for lack of a better term) who hires the protagonist. Mr. Henderson is an insanely rich, casually violent, orange-skinned shady businessman prone to over indulging his spoiled, not-the-brightest-bulb son (now why does this sound a bit familiar?)

But no need to get too caught up in politics, or my projecting American problems onto a British-Australian writer’s story. Will Save the Galaxy for Food is simply fun. If you’re a fan of A. Lee Martinez, Douglas Adams, or Christopher Moore, you will find this book to be the perfect read for bringing yourself out of a reality-induced funk.

Book Review: Artemis by Andy Weir


Artemis by Andy Weir

Life isn’t easy on the moon. Jasmine “Jazz” Bashara has lived in Artemis, the only lunar city, since she was six years old. The daughter of a respected welder, poor life choices have led Jazz down a path of near poverty and petty crime. When one of Artemis’ most wealthy citizens offers her a ridiculous amount of money to commit a serious crime, Jazz can’t say no. But getting the job done is only the start of her problems. Big, shadowy players are operating behind the scenes, and this caper could put Artemis itself in grave danger.

I loved Andy Weir’s previous novel, The Martian. Weir’s mix of science, outer space, and sarcastic humor made his modern day Robinson Crusoe story ridiculously fun. Artemis is more of the same, but now Weir had given us a heist novel . . . In Space! 

Jazz Bashara is five and a half feet of sarcastic supergenius, a young woman who blew her considerable potential in poorly-managed teenage rebellion. Using her considerable intellect to skirt along the edges of lawful lunar society, her goal is to get away from the day to day scrape of bottom-rung existence. Bring on the “one last big job” from a ridiculously wealthy client, and the heist begins.

Weir has again based his world in (what seems to my non-sciencey self) wonderfully realistic detail. As the ins and outs of Artemis are explained, we begin to see how the first human settlement on the moon might operate (I’m sure Neil deGrasse Tyson will rip the science apart, but hey). Jazz is a very similar character to The Martian’s Mark Watney, but sarcastic, smart characters really appeal to me, so I don’t mind,

Fans of The Martian or smart science fiction will probably really enjoy this book. We’re heading into new and uncharted territory in real-life space exploration, so I for one want to read all the realistic sci-fi in can get my mitts on.

An advance copy of this book was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. 

Book Review: Vacation Guide to the Solar System by Olivia Koski and Jana Grcevich

Vacation Guide to the Solar System

Vacation Guide to the Solar System: Science for the Savvy Space Traveler! by Olivia Koski and Jana Grcevich

Is the grind of life on Earth getting you down? Want to get away? Look no further! Vacation Guide to the Solar System is your one-stop guide to the farthest reaches of our celestial neighborhood. Want to know what to pack for a trip to Pluto? What to do when you arrive on Venus? What bungee jumping on Neptune would be like? Wonder no more!

In all seriousness, this book provides a huge amount of information, packaged in art deco, retro-futuristic kitsch. In addition to sci-fi information like baseball tournaments on the moon and ice skating (with heated skates to melt the rock-like ice) on Pluto, the book is also packed with the latest information on our neighboring planets, celestial bodies, comets, dwarf planets, and alien moons. The book itself is stunning, with gorgeous retro travel posters and illustrations combined with actual photos from NASA’s archives.

The whole thing was put together under the umbrella of Guerrilla Science (you should check out their website here). Guerrilla Science is a rouge collection of scientists and artists whose goal is to bring science to wide audiences through interactive and innovative installations and events. Their Intergalactic Travel Bureau provided the seed for this book.

This is a great source for information on our solar system, appropriate for kids and adults alike. Fans of astronomy, science, and science fiction should jump on this book. Anyone who likes entertaining nonfiction (Mary Roach’s Packing for Mars immediately springs to mind) will enjoy this book.

An advance copy of this book was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.